Portfolio > Installation and Performance

Wing to Be Worn
Wire, Fabric, Beeswax, Feathers and Pigment
20.5" x 34" x 23"
2012
Torso with Wings
Mixed Media
2002
Dancers for Boscobel, 2011
Mixed Media Installation, honeysuckle, wood, bamboo & jute
Detail 96”x 68”x 53”
Dancers for Boscobel, 2011
Honeysuckle, Wood, Bamboo, and Jute
105” x 83” x 69”, 97”x 79”x 60”, 96”x 68”x 53”
The Red Bed
Fabric, wire, foam wood, honeysuckle vines, synthetic and real hair, tree branches.
105"x134"x147"
2002
An Untamed Place, 2011
6'8" x 15' x 16'
Installation View, 
Lupe's Daughters 2009
Beeswax, wire, found objects, synthetic hair, and pigment.
The Miller's Daughter, 1999
Beeswax, fencing, cloth, and synthetic hair.
61" x 53" x 49"
Memory of Flight IV
Fencing, bees wax, found objects, synthetic hair, feathers, and pigment.
20.5" x 14"
2010
Memory of Flight III
Fencing, bees wax, found objects, synthetic hair, feathers, and pigment.
62" x 31" x 21.5"
2010
Memory of Flight III (back)
Fencing, bees wax, found objects, synthetic hair, feathers, and pigment.
62" x 31" x 21.5"
2010
Installation View
Beeswax, cloth, synthetic hair, fencing, rope, and wild rose-canes.
1999
Memory & Desire
Fabric, lace, fencing, bubble wrap, styrofoam peanuts, glue, synthetic hair, twine, and fishing line.
Standing figure: 48"x75"x44" Hanging Figure: 84"x44"x37"
2005
Memory & Desire (Detail)
Fabric, lace, fencing, bubble wrap, styrofoam peanuts, glue, synthetic hair, twine, and fishing line.
Standing figure: 48"x75"x44"
2005
Untitled Sister
Fencing, fabric, lace, synthetic hair, and beeswax
58"x40"x70"
2003
Mermaids
Fencing, fabric, thread, and beeswax.
70"x33"x41", 74"x34"x40"
2007

"Ms. Posner makes sculptures and mixed media works that are filled with imagination and energy. Her inspiration derives from fairy tales and Mexican shaman stories. She brings unconscious fantasies to life. Her characters are witches, maidens, gods, and creatures that are part human and part animal—shape-shifters—all suggesting the permeability of boundaries and a spiritual metamorphosis. Petrified dresses beckon viewers to take in both their absence and presence, and to question who they belong to and whether they might step into them and dream their dreams; branches shaped like female bodies sway and dance to the music of the wind; skins contort into strange shapes, both filled and empty, familiar and unfamiliar; and a child’s dress stands alone conjuring faraway, mysterious memories. All of Ms. Posner’s sculptures lack bodies yet they are embodied forms that possess a visceral presence. All of her sculptures are extremely evocative and we cannot help but respond to them with fear, desire, and longing.

Freud believed that the ego was first and foremost a body ego. The skin is the house of body and soul, a container for parts of the self, a contact barrier between the internal and external worlds and a major source of pleasure and pain. The skin represents the fragile corporeality of the human condition. All of these connotations are evoked in Ms. Posner’s work: her skins become the ultimate dwelling for a body of art. The pieces are whimsical and ethereal, yet serious, as life and death are serious."

-Danielle Knafo, Ph.D.,
Professor, Long Island University
Author, In Her Own Image: Women’s Self-Representation in Twentieth-Century Art
January 2012